Untitled Film Blog
"I met him at the hotel he was staying at — I was back in London for the London Film Festival — and I had read the script and I met him for coffee. And he kept on trying to leave! It had been ten minutes, and he said, “All right then,” and got up, and I was like, “Uhhh,” so I kept on trying to engage him in coversation. You know, Steve [McQueen] is an artist, and he’s very much of the mind-set that actors are artists, too, and everything around that is superfluous. We’re meant to create things, and that means taking away vanity and taking away the machine that surrounds it — though that [publicity] is a necessary thing and a good thing, because it gets people to watch the films that you do. 
 So he was talking about that, and he was like, “You’re an artist, you’re an artist!” And I said to Steve, “You know, I played Nina in The Seagull a couple of years ago, and I’ve never found a role onscreen that’s matched how difficult it was and how much I loved doing that part and how much it stayed with me. There’s no equivalent, and nothing I’ve done onscreen has been as hard or as interesting or as fun to do.” And then I read Shame and I was like, “She’s practically related to Nina, they’re like cousins, almost the same person. If I feel the way that I felt when I played Nina, I can play this onscreen,” which I’ve never been able to do, because I’m quite uncomfortable around cameras. 
 So I said that to Steve, and I said, “I’ve been thinking about getting this seagull tattoo on my wrist as a reminder, because there’s this brilliant thing Nina says in Act Four when she comes back and she’s completely fucked up — she’s had a child with this writer and she’s lost the baby and she’s lived in abject poverty, and she comes back and she’s fraught but she’s got this clarity — and she says, ‘I know now that it’s not about fame or glory or all the things I used to dream about. It’s the ability to endure, to bear your cross and keep the faith. I do have faith, and when I think about my vocation, I’m not afraid of life.’” [Beaming.] And I thought, That’s so sick! And it’s stayed with me, and when I told him about that little passage, he got excited and was like, “Yeeeah!” and I’m like, “I’ll get a tattoo!” and he’s like, “Great!” So it was sort of raucous and I got a call a couple of hours later that he was offering me the job, and I think it was only because I told him I was getting a tattoo. [Laughs.] I got the tattoo the following morning.”
- Carey Mulligan on how she got her part in Shame

"I met him at the hotel he was staying at — I was back in London for the London Film Festival — and I had read the script and I met him for coffee. And he kept on trying to leave! It had been ten minutes, and he said, “All right then,” and got up, and I was like, “Uhhh,” so I kept on trying to engage him in coversation. You know, Steve [McQueen] is an artist, and he’s very much of the mind-set that actors are artists, too, and everything around that is superfluous. We’re meant to create things, and that means taking away vanity and taking away the machine that surrounds it — though that [publicity] is a necessary thing and a good thing, because it gets people to watch the films that you do.

So he was talking about that, and he was like, “You’re an artist, you’re an artist!” And I said to Steve, “You know, I played Nina in The Seagull a couple of years ago, and I’ve never found a role onscreen that’s matched how difficult it was and how much I loved doing that part and how much it stayed with me. There’s no equivalent, and nothing I’ve done onscreen has been as hard or as interesting or as fun to do.” And then I read Shame and I was like, “She’s practically related to Nina, they’re like cousins, almost the same person. If I feel the way that I felt when I played Nina, I can play this onscreen,” which I’ve never been able to do, because I’m quite uncomfortable around cameras.

So I said that to Steve, and I said, “I’ve been thinking about getting this seagull tattoo on my wrist as a reminder, because there’s this brilliant thing Nina says in Act Four when she comes back and she’s completely fucked up — she’s had a child with this writer and she’s lost the baby and she’s lived in abject poverty, and she comes back and she’s fraught but she’s got this clarity — and she says, ‘I know now that it’s not about fame or glory or all the things I used to dream about. It’s the ability to endure, to bear your cross and keep the faith. I do have faith, and when I think about my vocation, I’m not afraid of life.’” [Beaming.] And I thought, That’s so sick! And it’s stayed with me, and when I told him about that little passage, he got excited and was like, “Yeeeah!” and I’m like, “I’ll get a tattoo!” and he’s like, “Great!” So it was sort of raucous and I got a call a couple of hours later that he was offering me the job, and I think it was only because I told him I was getting a tattoo. [Laughs.] I got the tattoo the following morning.”

- Carey Mulligan on how she got her part in Shame

"It’s as adult as you can possibly make it. This is adult drama. I grew up, as we fucking all did, watching The Godfather and that, movies that were made for adults. And this is a $100 million R-rated movie. Nobody makes those anymore. And [David] Fincher, he’s not holding back. They’ve given him free rein. He showed me some scenes recently, and my hand was over my mouth, going, Are you fucking serious?
It’s not that he simply showed me footage that was horribly graphic. It was stuff that was happening, or had happened. And somehow you don’t see it. There’s more than one way to sense violence. Much more powerful ways than seeing it step-by-step.”
- Daniel Craig on The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo

"It’s as adult as you can possibly make it. This is adult drama. I grew up, as we fucking all did, watching The Godfather and that, movies that were made for adults. And this is a $100 million R-rated movie. Nobody makes those anymore. And [David] Fincher, he’s not holding back. They’ve given him free rein. He showed me some scenes recently, and my hand was over my mouth, going, Are you fucking serious?

It’s not that he simply showed me footage that was horribly graphic. It was stuff that was happening, or had happened. And somehow you don’t see it. There’s more than one way to sense violence. Much more powerful ways than seeing it step-by-step.”

- Daniel Craig on The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo

"You start with trying to learn as much as you can about the property. Then try to figure out what it is that you have that nobody else has. Like, why am I going to your film? What do you have that I can’t get anywhere else? [You also have to] stay true to the story, especially these days. In advertising I don’t think you can be disingenuous at all. With social media and the speed of communication you have to be really honest and up front about what you have with your property and be true to the story.

So it’s all that and then trying to figure out an interesting and compelling way to communicate that. And that’s the hard part. A lot of times we’re coming into the process a little bit late and other people have been living with the story or the property for a lot longer than we have, so they’re much more intimate with it. So part of it is trying to glean that information out of those who are most knowledgeable about it.”

- Neil Kellerhouse on his design technique

Drive (Dir. Nicolas Winding Refn)
“When I read this script, the character seemed to me somebody who had seen too many movies and had become the star of his own action film, so that’s how I thought about it. 
Los Angeles is a fairy tale place, built on fantasy, so we made it a fairy tale land. We tried to make the Driver a knight and Irene [Carey Mulligan] this princess in the tower who needed to be rescued, Bernie Rose [Albert Brooks] was the evil wizard and Ron Perlman was the dragon.  We treated it like a Brothers Grimm fairy tale. Nicholas seems to think that it fits into neo-noir.

It was a great script, Hoss [Amini] had written a really great script, but it was so authentic to Los Angeles and gang culture and you would have to make a Ken Loach style film in order to honor that script– what we wanted to make was a violent John Hughes movie that was a fairy tale about a guy who drives around listening to music at night because that’s the only way he can feel anything.  And a guy who’s seen so many movies that he turned himself into his own super hero and made his own superhero costume [he pauses, miming the Scorpion jacket Driver wears], so that’s what excited us and Hoss helped us to realize that.

 We made this film for the audience, and we made it for the theatre. I wanted this movie to be a film that you wanted to be in the movie theatre to see, not one that you wanted to watch at home.  There are those movies [that you watch at home] but there are those films as well that you’re just glad that you’re in the theatre to see them.  For instance when I first saw Valhalla Rising, Nic’s movie, halfway through the movie, a character cuts open his friend and pulls out his guts and starts showing them to him and [the audience] lost their minds! They were hitting each other getting up laughing screaming it just evoked a real hodgepodge of emotions and I guarantee you everybody in that theatre—whether they liked it or not—were glad that they saw it in the theatre, so my hope is that what we made—we made [Drive] to be played loud, we made it for the big screen and hopefully people will appreciate that.”
- Ryan Gosling

Drive (Dir. Nicolas Winding Refn)

When I read this script, the character seemed to me somebody who had seen too many movies and had become the star of his own action film, so that’s how I thought about it.

Los Angeles is a fairy tale place, built on fantasy, so we made it a fairy tale land. We tried to make the Driver a knight and Irene [Carey Mulligan] this princess in the tower who needed to be rescued, Bernie Rose [Albert Brooks] was the evil wizard and Ron Perlman was the dragon. We treated it like a Brothers Grimm fairy tale. Nicholas seems to think that it fits into neo-noir.

It was a great script, Hoss [Amini] had written a really great script, but it was so authentic to Los Angeles and gang culture and you would have to make a Ken Loach style film in order to honor that script– what we wanted to make was a violent John Hughes movie that was a fairy tale about a guy who drives around listening to music at night because that’s the only way he can feel anything. And a guy who’s seen so many movies that he turned himself into his own super hero and made his own superhero costume [he pauses, miming the Scorpion jacket Driver wears], so that’s what excited us and Hoss helped us to realize that.

We made this film for the audience, and we made it for the theatre. I wanted this movie to be a film that you wanted to be in the movie theatre to see, not one that you wanted to watch at home. There are those movies [that you watch at home] but there are those films as well that you’re just glad that you’re in the theatre to see them. For instance when I first saw Valhalla Rising, Nic’s movie, halfway through the movie, a character cuts open his friend and pulls out his guts and starts showing them to him and [the audience] lost their minds! They were hitting each other getting up laughing screaming it just evoked a real hodgepodge of emotions and I guarantee you everybody in that theatre—whether they liked it or not—were glad that they saw it in the theatre, so my hope is that what we made—we made [Drive] to be played loud, we made it for the big screen and hopefully people will appreciate that.”

- Ryan Gosling