Untitled Film Blog
Marley (Dir. Kevin MacDonald)
""Marley" is the first feature to be backed by the Marley family as well as the legend’s longtime music label head Chris Blackwell which should make for the most insightful look at his life yet as it follows “the musician, revolutionary and legend from his earliest days to his rise to international superstardom” using rare footage, archival photos and incredible performances and interviews with his family, friends and bandmates. Blackwell executive produces alongside Marley’s son, Ziggy.”

Marley (Dir. Kevin MacDonald)

""Marley" is the first feature to be backed by the Marley family as well as the legend’s longtime music label head Chris Blackwell which should make for the most insightful look at his life yet as it follows “the musician, revolutionary and legend from his earliest days to his rise to international superstardom” using rare footage, archival photos and incredible performances and interviews with his family, friends and bandmates. Blackwell executive produces alongside Marley’s son, Ziggy.”

Beauty Is Embarrassing (Dir. Neil Berkeley)

"I first met Wayne in the Spring of 2001. He and I were doing work for the same company and while I like to say we immediately bonded, I have to admit that the friendship was one sided -the one side being mine -and involved my desperate attempt to stay friends with him and continually tell the world about his career. I think my experience with Wayne is similar to that of most people who come in contact with him: we’re amazed that more people haven’t heard the story of how he came to become an artist, and we’re touched by how kind, humorous and interesting he is as a person.

To me, Wayne’s story was always the perfect backdrop for a documentary. Here was this southern gentleman/hillbilly living in an amazing house in the top of the Hollywood Hills painting gorgeous images. Not only that, but he has also created some of the most iconic images of my childhood. I’ve been honored to know him and document his life.

The world has to know about Wayne, and we’re doing anything we have to do to make sure that happens. The reaction I get when I talk about his achievements consistently includes wide-eyed, gaping-mouthed amazement by people who have never heard of him by name. We’re going to change all that, and we’re going to do so with a visually stimulating homage to Wayne and all that he has created. The documentary is going to be a funny, touching, whimsical, light-hearted romp through Hollywood, the South and a fantasyland called Wayne’s mind.”

- Neil Berkeley

Beauty Is Embarrassing (Dir. Neil Berkeley)
"Beauty Is Embarrassing is a funny, irreverent, joyful and inspiring documentary featuring the life and current times of one of America’s most important artists, Wayne White. 
 Raised in the mountains of Tennessee, Wayne White started his career as a cartoonist in New York City. He quickly found success as one of the creators of the TV show, Pee-wee’s Playhouse, which led to more work designing some of the most arresting and iconic images in pop culture. Most recently, his word paintings, which feature pithy and often sarcastic text statements crafted onto vintage landscape paintings, have made him a darling of the fine art world. 
Beauty Is Embarrassing chronicles the vaulted highs and the crushing lows of a commercial artist struggling to find peace and balance between his work and his art. Acting as his own narrator, Wayne guides us through his life using moments from his latest creation: a hilarious, biographical one-man show. The pieces are drawn from performances at venues in Tennessee, New York and Los Angeles including the famous Roseland Ballroom and the Largo Theater. 
 Whether he’s parading a twenty foot tall puppet through the Tennessee hillside, romping around the Hollywood Hills dressed in his LBJ puppet suit, relaxing in his studio pickin’ his banjo, or watching his children grow up much too soon, Wayne White always seems to have a youthful grin and a desperate drive to create art and objects. It is an infectious quality that will inspire everyone to find their pleasure in life and pursue it at all costs. 
 At its core, Beauty Is Embarrassing is a reminder that we should all follow our passion. It is those creative impulses that will lead us to where we need to go.”

Beauty Is Embarrassing (Dir. Neil Berkeley)

"Beauty Is Embarrassing is a funny, irreverent, joyful and inspiring documentary featuring the life and current times of one of America’s most important artists, Wayne White.

Raised in the mountains of Tennessee, Wayne White started his career as a cartoonist in New York City. He quickly found success as one of the creators of the TV show, Pee-wee’s Playhouse, which led to more work designing some of the most arresting and iconic images in pop culture. Most recently, his word paintings, which feature pithy and often sarcastic text statements crafted onto vintage landscape paintings, have made him a darling of the fine art world.

Beauty Is Embarrassing chronicles the vaulted highs and the crushing lows of a commercial artist struggling to find peace and balance between his work and his art. Acting as his own narrator, Wayne guides us through his life using moments from his latest creation: a hilarious, biographical one-man show. The pieces are drawn from performances at venues in Tennessee, New York and Los Angeles including the famous Roseland Ballroom and the Largo Theater.

Whether he’s parading a twenty foot tall puppet through the Tennessee hillside, romping around the Hollywood Hills dressed in his LBJ puppet suit, relaxing in his studio pickin’ his banjo, or watching his children grow up much too soon, Wayne White always seems to have a youthful grin and a desperate drive to create art and objects. It is an infectious quality that will inspire everyone to find their pleasure in life and pursue it at all costs.

At its core, Beauty Is Embarrassing is a reminder that we should all follow our passion. It is those creative impulses that will lead us to where we need to go.”

Werner Herzog on the set of his latest work Death Row: A Documentary Series In Four Parts.
Essentially, this is what it’s like to be directed by Herzog. If you’re the subject, this is what you’re dealing with.

Werner Herzog on the set of his latest work Death Row: A Documentary Series In Four Parts.

Essentially, this is what it’s like to be directed by Herzog. If you’re the subject, this is what you’re dealing with.

George Harrison: Living In The Material World (Dir. Martin Scorsese)

George Harrison: Living In The Material World (Dir. Martin Scorsese)

George Harrison: Living In The Material World (Dir. Martin Scorsese)

Pearl Jam Twenty (Dir. Cameron Crowe)

Pearl Jam Twenty (Dir. Cameron Crowe)
“Pearl Jam Twenty chronicles the years leading up to the band’s formation, the chaos that ensued soon-after their rise to megastardom, their step back from center stage, and the creation of a trusted circle that would surround them—giving way to a work culture that would sustain them. Told in big themes and bold colors with blistering sound, the film is carved from over 1,200 hours of rarely-seen and never-before seen footage spanning the band’s career. Pearl Jam Twenty is the definitive portrait of Pearl Jam: part concert film, part intimate insider-hang, part testimonial to the power of music and uncompromising artists.”

Pearl Jam Twenty (Dir. Cameron Crowe)

Pearl Jam Twenty chronicles the years leading up to the band’s formation, the chaos that ensued soon-after their rise to megastardom, their step back from center stage, and the creation of a trusted circle that would surround them—giving way to a work culture that would sustain them. Told in big themes and bold colors with blistering sound, the film is carved from over 1,200 hours of rarely-seen and never-before seen footage spanning the band’s career. Pearl Jam Twenty is the definitive portrait of Pearl Jam: part concert film, part intimate insider-hang, part testimonial to the power of music and uncompromising artists.”

"Yes, as a fan I felt like their breakup was out of nowhere and I didn’t have any access to them. Q-Tip and Phife were always like they have to be together, like they say in the song, “Laverne to Shirley, Rerun to Chachi,” it was like Q-Tip and Phife. It was like, “What the fuck is going on?” They were really low key and classy about the breakup and I don’t think the breakup was anything unusual for a band. I think it was band breakup 101. There wasn’t any crazy story, it’s about relationships, fractured relationships. Going into the film, as a director, when I started realizing that those storylines were coming up, I related to that more and I gravitated towards that because I’ve had my own fractured relationships and I struggle with relationships to this day and they’re painful and they’re hard to deal with and I’m not probably the best at dealing with them. And seeing these guys go through that was something I related to. And that’s why I wanted to pull that out and show it, because my initial reason for making the movie, my directors reason was, “Will A Tribe Called Quest make more music?”
- Michael Rapaport
“Mike ultimately did a fine job. It may be hard to hear this, but I am truly humbled and accepting of it. Taking myself out of it, he really has a skill set as a director. It may be even stronger than his acting skills. And that’s a big compliment, because he’s a fine actor.”
- Q-Tip

"Yes, as a fan I felt like their breakup was out of nowhere and I didn’t have any access to them. Q-Tip and Phife were always like they have to be together, like they say in the song, “Laverne to Shirley, Rerun to Chachi,” it was like Q-Tip and Phife. It was like, “What the fuck is going on?” They were really low key and classy about the breakup and I don’t think the breakup was anything unusual for a band. I think it was band breakup 101. There wasn’t any crazy story, it’s about relationships, fractured relationships. Going into the film, as a director, when I started realizing that those storylines were coming up, I related to that more and I gravitated towards that because I’ve had my own fractured relationships and I struggle with relationships to this day and they’re painful and they’re hard to deal with and I’m not probably the best at dealing with them. And seeing these guys go through that was something I related to. And that’s why I wanted to pull that out and show it, because my initial reason for making the movie, my directors reason was, “Will A Tribe Called Quest make more music?”

- Michael Rapaport

“Mike ultimately did a fine job. It may be hard to hear this, but I am truly humbled and accepting of it. Taking myself out of it, he really has a skill set as a director. It may be even stronger than his acting skills. And that’s a big compliment, because he’s a fine actor.”

- Q-Tip

Beats, Rhymes & Life: The Travels of A Tribe Called Quest (Dir. Michael Rapaport)