Untitled Film Blog

Only God Forgives (Dir. Nicolas Winding Refn)

The new red band trailer for Ryan Gosling's bloody affair with 'Drive' director Nicolas Winding Refn. ‘Only God Forgives’.

Be prepared.

2013 Academy Award Nominations

Best Picture
"Amour"
"Argo"
"Beasts Of The Southern Wild"
"Django Unchained"
"Les Miserables"
"Life Of Pi"
"Lincoln"
"Silver Linings Playbook"
"Zero Dark Thirty"

Best Director
Michael Haneke - “Amour”
Benh Zeitlin - “Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
Ang Lee - “Life Of Pi”
Steven Spielberg - “Lincoln”
David O. Russell - “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Actor In A Leading Role
Denzel Washington - “Flight”
Hugh Jackman - “Les Miserables”
Daniel Day-Lewis - “Lincoln”
Joaquin Phoenix - “The Master”
Bradley Cooper - “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Actress In A Leading Role
Emmanuelle Riva - “Amour”
Quvenzhane Wallis - “Beasts Of The Southern Wild”
Naomi Watts - “The Impossible”
Jennifer Lawrence - “Silver Linings PLaybook”
Jessica Chastain - “Zero Dark Thirty”

Best Actor In A Supporting Role
Alan Arkin - “Argo”
Christoph Waltz - “Django Unchained”
Tommy Lee Jones - “Lincoln”
Philip Seymour Hoffman - “The Master”
Robert De Niro - “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Actress In A Supporting Role
Anne Hathaway - “Les Miserables”
Sally Field - “Lincoln”
Amy Adams “The Master”
Helen Hunt - “The Sessions”
Jacki Weaver - “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Original Screenplay
Michael Haneke - “Amour”
Quentin Tarantino - “Django Unchained”
John Gatins - “Flight”
Wes Anderson & Roman Coppola - “Moonrise Kingdom”
Mark Boal - “Zero Dark Thirty”

Best Adapted Screenplay
Chris Terrio - “Argo
Lucy Alibar, Benh Zeitlin - “Beasts of the Southern Wild”
David Magee - “Life Of Pi”
Tony Kushner - “Lincoln”
David O. Russell - “Silver Linings Playbook”

Best Foreign Language Film
"Amour"
"Kon-Tiki"
"No"
"A Royal Affair"
"War Witch"

Best Animated Feature Film
"Brave"
"Frankenweenie"
"ParaNorman"
"The Pirates! Band Of Misfits"
"Wreck-It Ralph"

Best Original Song
"Before My Time" - "Chasing Ice"
"Pi’s Lullaby" - "Life Of Pi"
"Suddenly" - "Les Miserables"
"Skyfall" - "Skyfall"
"Everybody Needs A Best Friend" - "Ted"

Best Cinematography
Seamus McGarvey - “Anna Karenina”
Robert Richardson - “Django Unchained”
Claudio Miranda - “Life Of Pi”
Janusz Kaminski - “Lincoln”
Roger Deakins - “Skyfall”

Best Film Editing
William Goldenberg - “Argo”
Tim Squyres - “Life Of Pi”
Michael Kahn - Lincoln
Jay Cassidy and Crispin Struthers - “Silver Linings Playbook”
William Goldenberg, Dylan Tichenor - Zero Dark Thirty

Best Costume Design
Jacqueline Durran - “Anna Karenina”
Paco Delgado - “Les Miserables”
Joanna Johnston - “Lincoln”
Eiko Ishioka - “Mirror Mirror”
Colleen Atwood - “Snow White and the Huntsman”

Best Documentary Feature
"5 Broken Cameras"
"The Gatekeepers"
"How To Survive A Plague"
"The Invisible War"
"Searching For Sugar Man"

Best Visual Effects
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey"
"Life Of Pi"
"Marvel’s The Avengers"
"Prometheus"
"Snow White And The Huntsman"

Best Production Design
Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer - “Anna Karenina”
Dan Hennah, Ra Vincent, Simon Bright - “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey”
Eve Stewart - “Les Miserables”
David Gropman, Anna Pinnock - “Life Of Pi”
Rick Carter, Jim Erickson, Peter T Frank - “Lincoln”

Best Original Score
Dario Marianelli - “Anna Karenina”
Alexandre Desplat - “Argo”
Mychael Danna - “Life Of Pi”
John Williams - “Lincoln”
Thomas Newman - “Skyfall”

Best Make Up
"Hitchcock"
"The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey"
"Les Miserables"

Best Sound Editing
"Argo"
"Django Unchained"
"Life Of Pi"
"Skyfall"
"Zero Dark Thirty"

Best Sound Mixing
"Argo"
"Les Miserables"
"Life Of Pi"
"Lincoln"
"Skyfall

Best Documentary Short Film
"Inocente"
"Kings Point"
"Mondays At Racine"
"Open Heart"
"Redemption"

Best Animated Short
"Adam And Dog"
"Fresh Guacamole"
"Head Over Heels"
"Maggie Simpson In The Longest Daycare"
"Paperman"

Best Live-Action Short Film
"Asad"
"Buzkashi Boys"
"Curfew"
"Death Of A Shadow"
"Henry"

Side Effects (Dir. Steven Soderbergh)

Side Effects is a provocative thriller about Emily and Martin (Rooney Mara and Channing Tatum), a successful New York couple whose world unravels when a new drug prescribed by Emily’s psychiatrist (Jude Law) – intended to treat anxiety – has unexpected side effects.

Side Effects (Dir. Steven Soderbergh)

Side Effects is a provocative thriller about Emily and Martin (Rooney Mara and Channing Tatum), a successful New York couple whose world unravels when a new drug prescribed by Emily’s psychiatrist (Jude Law) – intended to treat anxiety – has unexpected side effects.

"What really interests me most of all is getting me feeling good about what I’ve done and the people that I’ve worked with feeling good about what I’ve done."
- Tony Scott (1944-2012)

"What really interests me most of all is getting me feeling good about what I’ve done and the people that I’ve worked with feeling good about what I’ve done."

- Tony Scott (1944-2012)

Nerds, Dredd isn’t a ripoff of The Raid.

Relax. 

The biggest one anyone’s done since the silent era, in technical terms. Shooting on IMAX, you wanna justify that we’ve put our resources more into what we were shooting on the day than computer graphics. It’s not what you’re used to seeing. I don’t know when someone last did a film with 11,000 extras in a real environment. It is an escalation. You want things to be justifiably bigger and more extreme than what you’ve done in the last film. As long as the story supports that.
As the reviews for Ridley Scott’s much anticipated film, Prometheus trickle in, there are two common threads amongst these reviews. One, unfortunately for us as film goers, is that the film is a mild disappointment. In an effort to avoid spoilers, I haven’t read much of these reviews other than the lead paragraph. 
Secondly, this piece of advice may be a bit too late for many, but do not go into the film thinking that Prometheus is a prequel to Scott’s Alien. Prometheus exists in the world established by the Alien franchise, but it’s something different. 
As a public service announcement, let’s lower our expectations a bit about the film. We know we’re going to see a beautifully constructed film, but perhaps the film is lacking a little bit in the story department. That’s what you’re going to get with writer Damon Lindeloff. A really strong premise that doesn’t necessarily play off at the end. Also, don’t expect all of your questions about the initial Alien films to be answered. Just forget about it and try to enjoy Prometheus for what it is. 

As the reviews for Ridley Scott’s much anticipated film, Prometheus trickle in, there are two common threads amongst these reviews. One, unfortunately for us as film goers, is that the film is a mild disappointment. In an effort to avoid spoilers, I haven’t read much of these reviews other than the lead paragraph. 

Secondly, this piece of advice may be a bit too late for many, but do not go into the film thinking that Prometheus is a prequel to Scott’s Alien. Prometheus exists in the world established by the Alien franchise, but it’s something different. 

As a public service announcement, let’s lower our expectations a bit about the film. We know we’re going to see a beautifully constructed film, but perhaps the film is lacking a little bit in the story department. That’s what you’re going to get with writer Damon Lindeloff. A really strong premise that doesn’t necessarily play off at the end. Also, don’t expect all of your questions about the initial Alien films to be answered. Just forget about it and try to enjoy Prometheus for what it is. 

Despite your feelings regarding Martin Scorsese's Hugo, this little nugget of behind-the-scenes footage is a particular gem. For those who’ve seen the film, you’ll remember this as the steadicam one-take at the conclusion of the film. Props to Steadicam operator Larry McConkey for attaching the GoPro camera atop during the sequence.

Watching the actors hit their marks, furniture getting moved, and sets getting pulled out during the sequence is more than interesting, whether you’re a master filmmaker or a passing fan of film.

Two days ago, G.I. Joe: Retaliation director Jon M. Chu posted the above photo on his Twitter and Instagram accounts with the caption: “What ever u do… Do NOT press the button.”  We can safely assumed that many of Chu’s followers have already joked that somebody pushed the button after Paramount decided to change the release date of Retaliation.
On Wednesday, Paramount announced that the film was moving from June 29 to March 29, 2013 release. Paramount’s spin on the situation is that the film will go under a lengthy 3D conversion process. In other words, this film could be a total disaster and Paramount wants to find a way to minimize their loss. 
Ain’t It Cool News presents two interesting hypotheticals about Retaliation: potentially filming more scenes with Channing Tatum and 3D means higher ticket prices. 
It’s squeaky bum time in Hollywood especially if you’re a studio releasing a very expensive action/four quadrant movie. Nobody wants to lose their job or take a financial blood bath. Basically, nobody wants to have another John Carter or another Battleship on their hands. If 3D ticket prices might mean, let’s just say, an extra five million dollars to the domestic box office tally, that makes sense. More importantly, if 3D is popular in foreign markets like Asia, then go for it. A film no longer makes a majority of its money from domestic release, it’s all foreign box office returns.
Battleship was deemed a failure a few weeks before it’s North American release because it failed at the foreign box office. Was the film too ‘American’ for international audiences? Would 3D have saved the film? Maybe and probably not. While I personally enjoyed certain parts of Battleship, the audience, at large just rejected the film because it was inspired by a board game. There’s only so much that an audience can take. Comic books, video games, and theme park rides is where the line has been drawn. 
The first two trailers for G.I. Joe: Retaliation presented the film in an extremely positive light. Bright and colorful. Flying ninjas battles. The Rock and Bruce Willis chopping it up, shooting bad guys. In other words, an ideal summer popcorn movie. Additionally, the exact opposite of Stephen Sommers’ G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra. Chu’s film seems more closer in tone and style to the beloved cartoon series where as Sommers’ film had a strong international, James Bond vibe.
Also, the first two trailers for Retaliation did its best to distance themselves from the first film by theoretically killing off Channing Tatum and the Joes from the first film (save for Snake Eyes). I never thought that Tatum’s Duke was wiped from the slate….I just naturally assumed that the character would’ve poped up towards the end of the film and help save the day. 
Apparently, I was wrong and perhaps Paramount will find a way to include more Channing Tatum into the final film. Granted, I’m not an scheduling expert, but I’m not sure how that’s going to work. Tatum will most likely spend a good part of summer promoting Magic Mike and has two films lined up for the fall: Foxcatcher and White House Down. The Rock is very busy as well; he’s doing the new Michael Bay film right now, starting work on Fast & Furious 6 soon and an additional film as well. They will find a way, obviously but it just seems really daunting. 

Two days ago, G.I. Joe: Retaliation director Jon M. Chu posted the above photo on his Twitter and Instagram accounts with the caption: “What ever u do… Do NOT press the button.”  We can safely assumed that many of Chu’s followers have already joked that somebody pushed the button after Paramount decided to change the release date of Retaliation.

On Wednesday, Paramount announced that the film was moving from June 29 to March 29, 2013 release. Paramount’s spin on the situation is that the film will go under a lengthy 3D conversion process. In other words, this film could be a total disaster and Paramount wants to find a way to minimize their loss. 

Ain’t It Cool News presents two interesting hypotheticals about Retaliation: potentially filming more scenes with Channing Tatum and 3D means higher ticket prices. 

It’s squeaky bum time in Hollywood especially if you’re a studio releasing a very expensive action/four quadrant movie. Nobody wants to lose their job or take a financial blood bath. Basically, nobody wants to have another John Carter or another Battleship on their hands. If 3D ticket prices might mean, let’s just say, an extra five million dollars to the domestic box office tally, that makes sense. More importantly, if 3D is popular in foreign markets like Asia, then go for it. A film no longer makes a majority of its money from domestic release, it’s all foreign box office returns.

Battleship was deemed a failure a few weeks before it’s North American release because it failed at the foreign box office. Was the film too ‘American’ for international audiences? Would 3D have saved the film? Maybe and probably not. While I personally enjoyed certain parts of Battleship, the audience, at large just rejected the film because it was inspired by a board game. There’s only so much that an audience can take. Comic books, video games, and theme park rides is where the line has been drawn. 

The first two trailers for G.I. Joe: Retaliation presented the film in an extremely positive light. Bright and colorful. Flying ninjas battles. The Rock and Bruce Willis chopping it up, shooting bad guys. In other words, an ideal summer popcorn movie. Additionally, the exact opposite of Stephen Sommers’ G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra. Chu’s film seems more closer in tone and style to the beloved cartoon series where as Sommers’ film had a strong international, James Bond vibe.

Also, the first two trailers for Retaliation did its best to distance themselves from the first film by theoretically killing off Channing Tatum and the Joes from the first film (save for Snake Eyes). I never thought that Tatum’s Duke was wiped from the slate….I just naturally assumed that the character would’ve poped up towards the end of the film and help save the day. 

Apparently, I was wrong and perhaps Paramount will find a way to include more Channing Tatum into the final film. Granted, I’m not an scheduling expert, but I’m not sure how that’s going to work. Tatum will most likely spend a good part of summer promoting Magic Mike and has two films lined up for the fall: Foxcatcher and White House Down. The Rock is very busy as well; he’s doing the new Michael Bay film right now, starting work on Fast & Furious 6 soon and an additional film as well. They will find a way, obviously but it just seems really daunting.